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in "the wall street journal" with such assurance that this is all bogus science? who -- are they phonies? are they quacks? >> there are different motivations. some people don't want to hear about global warming because it's bad news, and there's enough bad news in the world, and everybody has plenty to worry about anyway. some people don't want to hear about it because it gets in the way of their economic interests. those would be the fossil fuel companies, for instance. and some people are just generally skeptical and don't like experts, and, frankly, i don't like experts all the time myself either. but these are the facts. every academy of science of every major country in the world has said this is happening. it's happening now. it's only going to get worse until we start taking actions to stem the emissions that are causing the problem. but in the meantime, this stuff is going to be happening even if we get emissions under control for some time, for decades, so we have to learn how to adapt better, how to prepare for such potential disasters, how to mitigate their damages. >> we don'
happened here, where so many experts in the field of environmental science have suggested that what is happening with these severe weather systems is becoming more frequent, as a result of climate change? >> well, martin, governor romney hasn't said a whole lot about a lot of things recently. you know, folks asked him 14 times yesterday, whether he was going to -- whether he wanted to get rid of fema. the last thing he heard or the last thing i remember hearing from governor romney on climate change was, he was questioning the science of climate change. and this is the same person who, when he was governor the first two years, was one of the leaders of reggie, the state consortium of governors, who wanted to do something about greenhouse gas emissions. two years later, he pulls out of it, as he was ramping up his run for president, the first run for president in 2008. so i think, you just -- he's been on every side of this issue, so the latest incarnation is that governor romney has questioned the science behind climate change. >> but also, john, i remember mr. romney's speech at th
other. >> well, if you look at the university level, the u.s. is still the predominant science and engineering engineer in the world. if you were quantitatively come look at all kinds of dissonance on the numbers because a very large engineering graduation rate in some curlers countries, particularly china. but there's a lot of dispute about what the numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, science and engineering in the u.s. and university level are so predominant in the world, though other countries are catching up as others have said because the u.s. was the only man left standing are the only person left standing at the end of world war ii and has a free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 is concerned, things are quite different. do you have huge disparity in quality, even with a few 50 miles or so, i think we were sitting today you can probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, k-12 and terrible quality. and that's a microcosm of the u.s. as a whole, which has huge inequalities in k-12 education system. so its average performance on all t
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
in science and engineering when they go to college they're less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study from the university of virginia found if you take two blacks or students of any color who one receives a large preference and one doesn't, the one that receives preference has a larger chance of dropping out. "mismatch" also affects academically inclined students who receive large preference who like to become university professors or academics. but predominantly receive low academic grades and decide economics is not for them. the biggest "mismatch" experiment was in california where voters passed a proposition with a large experiment of what happened when racial preferences are banned from university systems. it is extremely clear for anyone who played cares to look. within a half-dozen years the number of blacks in the university system has gone up by 30%. the number of blacks receiving a bachelor degrees went up by 70%. the number of degrees for hispanics, gpas of gone up. virtually every outcome has been a dramatic improvement. the colu
help doctors pinpoint those with the highest risk. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> current options includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto based cardio dx. it involves a blood draw that can be do
of man-made global warming is a hoax. >> the science is bad. >> unproven science. >> that has yet to be proven and i highly doubt it's going to happen any time soon. >> still a scientific theory that has not been proven. >> cenk: that's the media. that's the republicans. when you turn to the democrats i wish i had good news for you. but president obama hasn't been that much better in his results. now he was recently on mtv kind of like candy crowly, he views it as a niche-type-of-topic. >> obama: we're not moving as fast as we need to. this is an issue that further generations, mtv viewers are going to have to be dealing with, even more than the older generation. this is a critical issue. there is a huge contrast in this campaign between myself and governor romney. i'm surprised it didn't come up in one of the debates. >> cenk: here's how it could have come up, if you brought it up. did you notice, you mtv viewers i guess you care about this because you'll be around when things get really bad. although things are getting bad now. and he said he has a much different record than mit
have climate problem. and majority of americans believe in science. we have allowed the ignore ray mouses run the show on this and this should put an end to that. >> could it be that they have been measuring weather since 1898, could it be a global cyclical weather thing, actually not global warming but something that may have happened 500, 1,000 years ago you get pockets of this and we don't have the records to back it up. could it be that. >> i will answer it the way mayor bloomberg answered it, it could be that but do you want to take a risk? what if you are wrong? we are not prepared like we weren't prepared for this and we won't be prepared for the next thing and we weren't prepare fdr the drought this summer. how many times do we get punched in the face before we realize, something is punch me in the face. >> chad, you have been in the game nearly three decades, is this global warming we are seeing from a meteorological point of view, is there any other explanation. >> it's the prime suspect. i don't have one. maybe particulates in the air. the rain drops, the moisture can ge
a science fiction five-week long, six-week long science-fiction boot camp. and i did week four, which is when everyone cries and has a nervous breakdown spirit and they did indeed do that. which was great. [laughter] at one point, one of my guys said how can you tell? can you tell which of us is going to make it. and i said no. he said, but some of us are brilliant, and can you tell? and i said no. the ones that are going to make it would be the ones that write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant have written brilliant stories and never write again, they are the ones who get in there and write everyday and finish their stories. then they write the next ones. and they will make it. i saw him about four months ago in arlington. he was nominated for a nebula award and he said, you know, it works. he didn't get the award, but still very proud of him. [laughter] my wife and i love this very much. thank you very much. i also like to cheat on the voices because of the ones i like are in the tv series. the ones i didn't like, i substituted the ones that were in my head. wh
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
. john thorn writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick convers
watched for any science of depreciation following that meeting. let's have a look at the currency levels on the screen. 79.76 to 79 and the euro yen 102.94 to 99. the yen really is going to be closelywatcd. >> what's the latest on the earnings stream? >> a lot of earnings. we've been focused on export relates. july to september group net profits showed a small gain due to fixed income trading. it's going through severe cost cutting measures as well as internal management infrastructure and losses to investment banki structure. still a lot of folks on the alle details. just checking the price action today it's up 3%. markets taking it as a bit of a positive. back to you. >> thanks. people running japan's local governments may so beurning out their pockets for loose ange afterational government officials say they will postpone the payment of tax grants. the move comes as it looks increasingly unlikely to pass a bill to issue deficit covering bonds. the main opposition parties are against it. the bonds are necessary to implement the budget. government officials say they could run out of mon
of these technologies encourage architects to build taller buildings. engineering and materials science provided a higher quality of steel to build with, and having passenger elevators meant it was the necessary anymore to climb a long flight of stairs to get to the top of the building. the elevator made the upper floors of the building more attractive than they were before. >> here we were at the historic st. francis hotel, which was actually a representation of the evolution of elevators. can you tell us more about san francisco history here at the st. francis? >> sure. st. francis demonstrates well the evolution of elevated technology. and substantially damaged the 1906 earthquake and rebuilt in 1907 or 1908, and extend it again in 1913. then a new tower was added in 1932, so there is all sorts of elevator technology you can see at the st. francis that very much represents the building history of san francisco. >> i understand there is a really old elevator still operating here. >> that is right, the elevator installed in the 1913 expansion. we can go look at that. >> let's go take a look. he
to have a really sound science before you make those difficult decisions. you know, i am a scientist. i have been taking care patients for 30 years. and i know that you don't change an operation that you do because some people have said that this new operation is a lot better. all right. you need to have years of unbiased will result before you make a critical decision that affect people's lives. frankly, i have not been convinced us what the real facts are. and i certainly don't know that we should be spending trillions of dollars over science that is argued about. because i have been through this before. i have seen people tout the medical theory, saying how great it was and see people act on that end the disastrous results. and i don't want to do that in the field of global warming. >> moderator: thank you. mr. mcdowell, you have one minute. mcdowell: i just look at the scientific issues. this should be an issue based solely on the science of the issue. right now, our legs have dropped about 20 inches in the last 10 years. i looked across the bigger and it really frightens me. i don'
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
arts and science dregrease. they might as well not go to college. we are facing a short fall of tech engineerings. and we are not doing anything to try to cover that short fall. sally is right. the problem is the public colleges is that the states are having to cut spend it is e priorities of the states spending can approximate but keeping the social entitlements and they reform them to give something to education. >> i am still using my communication degree. and sally, thank you for joining. >> tt is not liberal artings. >> oh, john. >> but mine. >> and forgethe election, why big laborororor >> it's time for what i need to know next week. >> after the election there is events to pssure lawmakers not to save social security and medicare. >> and john lay field. >> if you listen to wayne and johnathon you make money. there is a way to work with ford and it is a good stock. >> and up to wayne rogers. >> thank you, john. i like ford, too. the cash america trade suggest less and nine times earnings. >> johnathon? >> i like the floating rate funds pennant park. pflt. i ownit in my asset ma
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of health
to his last which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> here is this a shot from 31st and lake shore drive that he took at 3:00 and a gorgeous polestar sunrise from rosewood beach highland park illinois but we thought we would go up to lake superior this time we have seen these images who is a meteorologist and she is one of our former intern's and look at these shots from dust and both of the waves on lake superior and the snow dustin tells us he is already tired of the snow but you have a long winter ahead of you because it's only starting beautiful shots though. the first signs that the light northeast wind and a 25 degree temperature drop you need a 15 degree drops so that clouds conform. in a month that is almost 11 degrees cooler than november last year we are averaging 42.5 degrees. today for instance we have a high of 48. but we have averaged about 5 degrees below normal. look at these temperatures down in texas and oklahoma while the child grows up to the northeast part of the reason for that and these are current temperatures look at
's for science. and here's a rubber rod. what i'm gonna do is i'm gonna rub the rubber rod against the cat's fur. now, what i'm doing... [meowing] [laughter] [meowing] [laughter] i don't know what that is. but anyway, what i'm doing here, gang, is what? i'm rubbing electrons from here on here. and you know why? it turns out every substance-- it's holding its electrons, yeah? how many say, "oh, all substances must hold their electrons with just the same force"? coincidence of coincidences. no way. that's not true. different things will hold electrons with more force than others. and guess what doesn't hold electrons very good? it begins with f, ends with r. i got a u in the middle, try it. fur. fur. or your hair. okay. guess what holds electrons very nicely? it begins with r, ends with u-b-b-e-r. rubber. rubber, okay? and so when i take the rubber and i scrape it against the fur, what am i doing? i rub electrons from the fur onto the rod. now, the rod has more electrons than before. you, people at front row, can you see those things? yes. okay. [makes noise] follow me, i'll make your crops grow.
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
. no science about the workout, no science about breathing. they're just saying it's anti-christian. let me tell you something in my opinion it is a constitutionally unhinged argument. there is no basis. you know what, i spent time in federal court getting restraining orders under the first amendment. let them take it into federal court. the federal judge is not going to grant a restraining order. it is not anti-christian, it is not prose la tizing. it is absolutely proper for these 5500 kids to be exposed to this physical workout. >> richard, why now after three years and like a half million dollar grant to keep this program going? >> yeah. i respectfully disagree with my dear friend, avery, on this one. whenever you're using public funds in public schools, you cannot, you cannot force children to take any sort of religious activity. and be in this particular case -- >> isn't that -- is this a religious activity or is this exercise? >> the allegation. >> thank you. that's the point. >> in the course of the exercising, what they are teaching is eastern hinduism. the poses are out of respect
's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we demand a lot more of younger and younger children and girls develop faster than boys. that is where it starts and people say boys get a sense of themselves as a little bit of failures in school. not because they're less smart. boys and girls are equally smart. it has to do with extra issues like discipline and can you sit still and what schools are demanding of kids comes more naturally to girls than boys. i have an addendum to that i will get into in a minute and then you move to community college and other college and for every two degrees men get women get three degrees. that is a huge disparity. they reached parity about the 80s and since t
that you can. so, we use those kinds of principles that are basically at the heart of a lot of science to be able to do this somewhat miraculous feet producing an accurate representation by just talking with a small fraction. host: are they accurate? guest: well, they are. polling has a very good track record of accurately predicting the elections even though that is not our main purpose. is one way we can know that polls are accurate. in fact, of all the surveys that are done it is one of the only ones that has a very clear outside way to validate all the polsters including the pew will do a final poll and put the estimates out the next week or so before the election and on election day we will find out how accurate we were. four years ago we were within one point of picking the exact mark. eight years ago we were dead on the margin. and we are not the only ones that have a good track record. most polling does a very good job of predicting how the election will turn out. host: how do you a do a poll from the beginning to the end? guest: it is a fairly straightforward process. we do se
of people that are far advanced when it comes to science and technology, and even the ability to socialize with each other- we are more socially mature than most people that i meet outside of america. but i think we are far behind our advancement in technoscience and technology when it comes to social maturity- perceiving what society should be, what a human being is. i think we have exaggerations, some of us, of what a human being is and what we should expect of a human being- exaggerations- and some of us poorly estimate the value of human beings. so we are not- to me, we are not the greatest society when it comes to social maturity. >> you know, that's one of the problems we've wrestled with in this class over and over again, because we hear such beautiful statements of love and caring and equality and justice coming from deeply religious people, and it's like you say, you know, somehow we haven't matured to a level that even respects the religions we profess. i'm just curious, in terms of your understanding of islam, how does that, in your own life, lend itself to making us better- bet
believes in science and does not scoff at the idea of climate change and has taken concrete action to combat it, mr. bloomberg said the choice to him is clear. "one sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet. one does not. i want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics." this endorsement criticized mitt romney's leadership on the other hand saying, "in the past mr. romney has also taken sensible positions, but he has reversed course on all of them and is even running against the health care model he signed into law in massachusetts." mike bloomberg criticizes mr. romney specifically for flip-flopping and dropping his previous positions on climate change then says, "this issue is too important. we need determined leadership at the national level." in other words, i don't think we're going to get determined leadership from mitt romney. i think he has taken occasionally attractive positions, but leadership, no. speaking to you from new york city, this storm and its aftermath, this externality to the big election i
science to get in the way of politics but the obama administration hasn't been out front on the issue either. we will talk mother nature's revenge when chris hayes joins us just ahead. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop t
sciences, and technology. >> off to the world of fashion now, which this we can be found not on the catwalks of milan, paris, or new york, but in south africa. >> that is right. african as well as international labels are showcasing the latest designs at the fashion week in johannesburg. >> african fashion has lately swung into the international spotlight with design is replacing bold colors and patterns with more contemporary designs. >> modern and confident -- the latest in south african fashion. the show was the hit of the festival. her cutting its creations have wowed critics. >> the techniques that i use, they make you feel -- like this one is not like what we know or what our people know. >> she is not the only hit designer here. african fashion has never been more popular. designers from ghana, morocco, and 10 other african countries have been showing off their creations in johannesburg. behind the scenes, for has been flying. african fashion is plugged into international trends. >> i am very excited because are looking and also the ladies, so i am hopingrything es
at the classes in livermore including science, english, math and history coursees. >>> a 27-year-old man was shot and killed. he was standing outside of the halfway house where he lives wait for a ride to work. it happened at 5:45 this morning at adams point neighborhood. neighbors heard as many as 10 gunshots. vinceept jones junior was on his way -- vincent jones junior was on his way to work at goodwill at the time of the shooting. >>> the highway patrol is making good on a promises to fight crime in oakland. the officers will help patrol city streets starting next week. a highway patrol says the add officers would be working on overtime. >>> ahead in 4 minutes why the police in one part of oakland had their hands full this afternoon. >>> a couple with bay area ties are grieving the death of two young children who were stabbed by their nanny. the children's mother, marina krim returned to her new york apartment with her 3-year-old daughter to find her 2-year-old son and 6-year-old daughter dead in the bath tub. the nanny, ortega, had self- inflicted stab wounds. so far no charges are filed. the
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ >> read my lips. ♪ >> jennifer: you are back inside "the war room." i'm jennifer granholm. if you feel like there has been a lot more presidential campaign tv commercials this year than there was in 2008, you would be right. four years ago, about 637,000 adsed a aired at this point in the race. this year, that number has sky rock setted to 915,000 commercials, a 44% increase. unbelievable. enough to make you long for the days when political tv ads were a novelty. well, tonight in part two of our eight-part series the selling of the presidents. barry lank takes us back to when it all began. >> it was 1952 television was the big new thing. >> eisenhower answers america. >> dwight eisenhower's team lead the way to bring the candidate right into america's living rooms. >> help me put the lid on crazy government spending. >> the ads were very effective. they made more than 40 eisenhower america spots. >> the camera in eisenhower was l
is a fellow at the academy of sciences that shot this video. when it comes to ocean research, silvia is the gold standard. and she says it is time the rest of us start paying attention. >> we are messing around with the chemistry of the planet. >> reporter: at the moments she is focusing on tiny organisms. it is a greenish single cell creature discovered by the mit professor. this glass of ocean water could willed ho billions. could hold billions. >> it contributes 20% of the oxygen in the atmosphere. >> reporter: an incredible one-fifth comes from this minute species, critical to life as we know it. >> it does two important things. it generates oxygen, and it takes up carbon. carbon dioxide. it trans -- transforms that to cor bow hydrates. it is -- carbohydrates. >> reporter: but the fragile ecosystem is damaged by excess carbon from cars, power plants and factories. the carbon turns the ocean more acidic making it caw corrosive to shellfish and coral. they are not sure of the affect, but silvia says we can't wait to find out. >> the trend is clear. we are losing elements that keep
the ocean. she is a fellow at the academy of sciences that shot this video. when it comes to ocean research, silvia is the gold standard. and she says it is time the rest of us start paying attention. >> we are messing around with the chemistry of the planet. >> reporter: at the moments she is focusing on tiny organisms. it is a greenish single cell creature discovered by the mit professor. this glass of ocean water could willed ho billions. could hold billions. >> it contributes 20% of the oxygen in the atmosphere. >> reporter: an incredible one-fifth comes from this minute species, critical to life as we know it. >> it does two important things. it generates oxygen, and it takes up carbon. carbon dioxide. it trans -- transforms that to cor bow hydrates. it is -- carbohydrates. >> reporter: but the fragile ecosystem is damaged by excess carbon from cars, power plants and factories. the carbon turns the ocean more acidic making it caw corrosive to shellfish and coral. they are not sure of the affect, but silvia says we can't wait to find out. >> the trend is clear. we are losing elements th
has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained by the worse economic downturn since our great depre
in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. what we know isboron is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of the republican par
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